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Arinitwe Peter

I'm an East Afrikan Artivist seeking social and environmental justice

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About Arinitwe 

As a Ugandan artist, I use my work to communicate issues affecting our societies’ that are detrimental to the development and progress of our people - from barbaric acts of female genital mutilation to domestic violence, the destruction of our planet and the deep divisions between our politicians and the people they serve.
 

I believe an artist creates when there is a need to create:  I use visual art as a tool to bring the public’s attention to these issues, a way to bring crowds closer to complex issues due to the beauty within the painting, in a way that does not require any academic document to consume it, and is accessible to all no matter what age, sex or level of education.

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At the Butchery

Female genital mutilation or FGM is recognized internationally as a violation of the human rights of girls and women.  It reflects deep-rooted inequality between the sexes, and constitutes an extreme form of discrimination against women. It is nearly always carried out on minors and is a violation of the rights of children. 


I believe it is every person’s responsibility to know and talk about FGM. It can’t be left only to our women and sisters whose voices remain unheard and ignored as a result of gender inequality. One of my visions as a contemporary artist is to inspire free will around the matter of FGM and see that women have a powerful and heard voice across Africa. 

The Action

“Ugandan artist Arinitwe Peter has managed to captivate the audience with his thought-provoking art pieces which talk about the society we live in. His artistic ability shows that art as a form of communication tool can convey elaborate messages in a unique and vivid way.”

The Beat

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The Lost Afrikan Parliament

Before the days of modern day central parliament, where ministers, and the army convene, there used to be tree parliaments in every village in Afrika, headed by the elders, most often whom were women. Parliament life was based on community and conducted in the best interest of societies. They were highly respected and celebrations took place through local dances during  breaks.

 Where there used to be positivity and decisions for the good of society, there are now men employed to protect their own interests with corruption at its peak. Where they were once run by women, who made decisions for the good of our children, we now have 90% ministers who are men, with women seen as too week to join in the discussions. This is the Lost Afrikan Parliament

I believe that an artist creates when there is a need to create: 
I use art as a tool to bring the public’s attention to these issues, a way to bring crowds closer to complex issues due to the beauty within the painting - it should be accessible to all no matter what age, sex or level of education.

Arinitwe Peter

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In The Time of Corona

As an artist, I am inspired to paint about issues affecting our societies’ that are detrimental to the development and progress of our people - none being more important than the destruction of our planet caused by human activity.

 

In the following works I tackle issues including the coronavirus pandemic, a result of humanity’s destruction and imbalance with nature; societies’ obsession and reliance on plastics that are choking our waterways, and the increasing inequalities between genders and countries that is fuelling a rise in environmental degradation.

“If you are not part of the solution, then you are the problem”.

Arinitwe Peter

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